Kidney Diseases

Very low levels of azotaemia may produce few, if any, symptoms. Kidney failure accompanied by noticeable symptoms is termed uraemia. Treatment of the underlying cause of kidney failure may return kidney function to normal. Lifelong efforts to control blood pressure and diabetes may be the best way to prevent chronic kidney disease and its progression to kidney failure. In acute renal failure, kidney function is lost rapidly and can occur from a variety of insults to the body. Since most people have two kidneys, both kidneys must be damaged for complete kidney failure to occur.

With end-stage renal disease, you need dialysis or a kidney transplant to stay alive. But you can also choose to opt for conservative care to manage your symptoms — aiming for the best quality of life during your remaining time. Risk factors for chronic kidney disease include older age, low birth weight, obesity, smoking, high blood pressure, diabetes, a family history of kidney disease, and being of African-American descent. When kidney disease is diagnosed early, during microalbuminuria, several treatments may keep kidney disease from getting worse.

A catheter is placed in the abdominal cavity through the abdominal wall by a surgeon, and it is expected to remain in place for the long-term. The dialysis solution is then dripped in through the catheter and left in the abdominal cavity for a few hours after which, it is drained out. During that time, waste products leech from the blood flowing through the lining of the abdomen , and attach themselves to the fluid kidney disease expert witness testimony that has been instilled by the catheters. Often, patients instill the dialysate fluid before bedtime, and drain it in the morning. Symptoms of kidney failure are due to the build-up of waste products and excess fluid in the body that may cause weakness, shortness of breath, lethargy, swelling, and confusion. Inability to remove potassium from the bloodstream may lead to abnormal heart rhythms and sudden death.

Because of this, excess fluid and waste from blood remain in the body and may cause other health problems, such as heart disease and stroke. Calculate your Glomerular Filtration Rate , which is the best way to tell how much kidney function you have. Your doctor can calculate it from your blood creatinine, your age, race, gender and other factors. Your GFR tells your doctor your stage of kidney disease and helps the doctor plan your treatment. A healthy kidney eliminates waste from the blood and maintains the body’s chemical balance. With polycystic kidney disease , fluid-filled sacs called cysts develop in the kidneys.

The rate of progression depends on age, the underlying diagnosis, the implementation and success of secondary preventive measures, and the individual patient. Timely initiation of chronic renal replacement therapy is imperative to prevent the uremic complications of CKD that can lead to significant morbidity and death. Stages of kidney failureChronic kidney failure is measured in five stages, which are calculated using the person’s GFR, or glomerular filtration rate. Stage 1 CKD is mildly diminished renal function, with few overt symptoms.

Early detection and treatment can often keep chronic kidney disease from getting worse. When kidney disease progresses, it may eventually lead to kidney failure, which requires dialysis or a kidney transplant to maintain life. Causes of acute kidney failure include low blood pressure, blockage of the urinary tract, certain medications, muscle breakdown, and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Causes of chronic kidney failure include diabetes, high blood pressure, nephrotic syndrome, and polycystic kidney disease.

Chronic kidney disease, also called chronic kidney failure, involves a gradual loss of kidney function. Your kidneys filter wastes and excess fluids from your blood, which are then removed in your urine. Advanced chronic kidney disease can cause dangerous levels of fluid, electrolytes and wastes to build up in your body. Chronic kidney disease can be a confusing concept to grasp insofar as it is caused by other illnesses or medical conditions. Patients with chronic kidney disease generally experience progressive loss of kidney function and are at risk for end-stage renal disease .

Your doctor can calculate it from the results of your blood creatinine test, your age, race, gender and other factors. Ask your provider whether these tests are necessary for you. If you have a medical condition that increases your risk of kidney disease, your doctor may monitor your blood pressure and kidney function with urine and blood tests during office visits. Tangri et al developed and validated a model in adult patients that uses routine laboratory results to predict progression from CKD (stages 3-5) to kidney failure.

People suffering from acute kidney injury require supportive treatment until their kidneys recover function, and they often remain at increased risk of developing future kidney failure. Although they both may experience the same symptoms, CKD may progress differently in men and women. Urinary tract infections and kidney infections are more common in women, which may cause kidney disease to develop.